2016 Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) Grantee List

Overview

2016 Healthy Food Financing Initiative Grantee List.

2011 Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) Grantee List

Overview

2011 Healthy Food Financing Initiative Grantee List.

The Vermont Farm to Plate Investment Program

Overview

This profile highlights the Farm to Plate (F2P) Investment Program, which was designed to strategically strengthen the state’s food and farm sector and encourage the purchasing of local foods.
 
The Vermont Legislature commissioned the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund to develop a strategic plan to revitalize its food and farm sectors and increase purchasing of local foods. Implementation is under way with more than 350 organizations working together as the Farm to Plate Network, including the Farm to Institution Task Force focused on increasing institutional local food procurement.

WEBINAR-Funding Your Healthy Food Project with USDA Resources

Overview

As a nation, we must foster a food system that ensures urban and rural communities have access to fresh and healthy foods; small and mid-size farmers can produce and market food in an economically and sustainable manner; and consumers have the resources they need to live healthy and productive lives.
 
This webinar introduces the audience to several programs at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and provide examples of how USDA funding is being tapped to improve access to healthy foods and support local food system development in low-income urban communities.

Profile: Nojaim Brothers Supermarket and the New York Healthy Food and Healthy Communities (HFHC) Fund

Overview

The Nojaim Brothers Supermarket, Syracuse’s only independently owned grocery store, and a community hub — faced possible closure in 2010 due to dated infrastructure and decades of population and economic decline.
 
In addition to renovating his store, Paul Nojaim is working to help revitalize the Near Westside neighborhood. Through his leadership, the store is collaborating with St. Joseph’s Hospital, Syracuse University, and the Onondaga County Department of Health on several initiatives.

WEBINAR-Research Your Community: Virtual Training

Overview

Research Your Community is a new mapping tool available on the Healthy Food Access Portal that can help individuals and organizations better understand the communities in which they are working in to improve access to healthy food.

The tool can also be a valuable resource for your advocacy and fundraising efforts. The grocery landscape is ever changing, and data is one of many ways to paint a picture of a community’s need for healthy food access interventions. This webinar will train users about how to effectively leverage this new tool.

Profile: Cooperative Fund of New England

Overview

The Cooperative Fund of New England  has played a leading role in financing the Northeast’s cooperative food movement. As a CDFI it has served as a financer, lender, and advisor to nearly every food co-op in the area.

Cooperatives differ from traditional businesses in that they are jointly owned by, and operated for the benefit of, the people using their services. A cooperative’s profits are distributed among its members, and decisions are made democratically.

Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Financing in Michigan

Overview

Michigan must address the significant need for fresh food resources in many of its communities. A myriad of factors have created a shortage of healthy food resources in lower-income areas across the state, creating a public health
crisis.
 
Despite having the nation’s second most diverse agriculture industry, 17.9% of Michigan’s residents are food insecure, meaning they lack reliable access to healthy food. In Kent County, home to Grand Rapids, the largest city in West Michigan, 80,000 people are food insecure.
 
More than 1.8 million Michigan residents, including an estimated 300,000 children, live in lower-income communities with limited
supermarket access. Underserved communities can be found in rural areas such as Hillsdale, Tuscola, Sanilac, Cold Water and Allegan, as well as in urban centers including Flint and Detroit.

2014 Analysis of Limited Supermarket Access

Overview

Reinvestment Fund's 2014 LSA analysis is an update to the 2011 study, Searching for Markets: The Geography of Inequitable Access to Healthy and Affordable Foods in the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s CDFI Fund through the Opportunity Finance Network. Reinvestment Fund undertook the 2014 update when our lending department observed that there were enough changes since the 2011 study (i.e., stores had opened and closed) that it was no longer sufficient for making financing decisions.

WEBINAR-Equity in Healthy Food Access: Engaging Women and Entrepreneurs of Color

Overview

This webinar highlighted strategies and valuable resources for engaging female entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs of color in financing healthy food access projects. 
 
The webinar presented the economic potential of entrepreneurs of color and female entrepreneurs, common barriers and challenges to accessing capital, promising approaches for connecting smaller businesses with resources, as well as case studies and best practices from the field. 

Profile: Healthy Food Financing and Pyburn's Farm Fresh Foods

Overview

Houston, home to over two million, is the fourth-largest city in the country, boasts a diverse industrial base and profitable health-care sector, and is one of the wealthiest cities in Texas.

Government leaders, community-based organizations, and business owners are, however, working toward a healthier city and a brighter future with the launch of a citywide healthy food financing initiative to spur affordable, fresh food retail development and the groundbreaking of Pyburn’s Farm Fresh Foods.

Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Retail in the Greater Dallas Area

Overview

Dallas must address the significant need for fresh food resources in many of its neighborhoods. Several factors have led supermarkets to disinvest from lower-income communities, contributing to a public health crisis.
 
CHILDREN AT RISK, a local research and advocacy group, and The Food Trust, a nationally recognized nonprofit, issued Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Retail in the Greater Dallas Area to ensure that all children and their families live in communities that have access to healthy and affordable food. This goal can be achieved by encouraging the development and expansion of healthy food retail outlets in underserved communities throughout Dallas. 

WEBINAR-Creating Equitable Food Systems with the Healthy Food Financing Initiative

Overview

Across the country, the federal Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) is working to increase access to healthy food in low income communities and communities of color. The program is supporting food retailers that are increasing equity by improving regional food systems, creating jobs, and strengthening local economies. 
 
This webinar will highlight how healthy food projects supported by HFFI, including food hubs and similar, innovative enterprises, are better connecting regional agriculture to local consumers. Experts will discuss challenges and share best practices and information on how to leverage financial and community-powered resources to ensure the success food regional food systems under an equity framework.

Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Financing in Alabama

Overview

Alabama must address the significant need for supermarkets and other fresh food resources in many of its communities. Many factors have led supermarkets to limit investments in lower-income communities across the state, leading to a public health crisis. The Food Trust, a nationally recognized nonprofit, issued Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Financing in Alabama to document these findings and to ensure that Alabama’s 1.2 million children and their families live in communities that have access to healthy and affordable food.1 This report demonstrates the need for a statewide financing program to encourage healthy food retail development in Alabama.

Counting Values: Food Hub Financial Benchmarking Study

Overview

The nationwide emergence of food hubs is an indicator that local food is becoming more readily available in higher-volume sales channels. The more than 300 food hubs operating around the country use a wide range of business models. All share the general function of helping farmers and other local food producers take their differentiated products to market.

These intermediaries provide customized aggregation, distribution, and related supply chain services. Food hubs also strive to deliver on local market promises—the good food values driving this sector’s growth. Good food is defined as food products and practices that are healthy for the body, green for the planet, fair for producers and workers, and affordable for all. Good food values range from concerns for public health and social justice to demand for local economic and environmental returns.

Running A Food Hub: Lessons Learned from the Field

Overview

In recent years, several surveys—including the 2013 National Food Hub Survey and the Food Hub Benchmarking Study—have collected data on U.S. food hubs. What seems to be lacking from the current research on food hubs is information on operations and “lessons learned” from those involved in starting and operating food hubs. To help fill this void, interviews were conducted with the leaders of 11 food hubs, using an open-ended, free-flowing format. This allowed for maximum flexibility during each interview and the ability to further capture the unique nature of each entity. The food hubs, located throughout the United States, represent a diversity of organization types, product offerings, operation structures, and missions.

Profile: C Fresh Market

Overview

C Fresh Market is a 23,000-square-foot supermarket located in River Bend — one of the oldest and most ethnically diverse communities in Des Moines, Iowa. The community had not had a full-service supermarket for almost 10 years when C Fresh opened in January of 2013. The store has been developing a diverse and loyal customer base ever since and offers a variety of affordable ethnic and international groceries to the surrounding population.

The project received $712,000 in loan financing from IFF, a nonprofit community development financial institution serving the Midwest region.

WEBINAR-Building a Healthy Corner Store Network

Overview

In communities that lack supermarkets or other types of full-service food retail, families depend on corner stores for the majority of their food purchases. The choices at these stores are often limited to processed foods and very little, if any, fresh produce. An effective approach to improving healthy food access in corner stores is the development and launch of Healthy Corner Store Initiatives. As a result, networks of healthy corner stores in cities and states are emerging across the country. While the models and size can vary, the overarching goal remains the same: working with corner store operators and partners to source, price and promote healthier items in their stores. This webinar explores strategies, tactics, best practices and lessons learned on launching and implementing healthy corner store networks by highlighting existing efforts in New Jersey, San Jose, CA, & Cleveland, OH.
 
Speakers:
 
--Kamaryn Norris, National Campaign for Healthy Food Access Associate, The Food Trust (moderator)
 
--Erin Healy, Director of Healthy Eating Initiative, The Health Trust
 
--Ana Ramos, New Jersey Food Access Coordinator, The Food Trust
 
--Lindsay Smetana, Community Organizer and Program Manager, Tremont West Development Corporation

Profile: Salud Corporation

Overview

In 2011, Salud Corporation received a $341,000 Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) grant to grow the olive oil milling, bottling, and distribution capacities at a local facility in Dripping Springs, Texas. Salud Corporation is a for-profit social enterprise subsidiary of Business and Community Lenders of Texas (BCL of Texas), a nonprofit economic development organization. Salud is the country’s first Latina-led, start-up to manufacture and distribute high-quality, 100 percent extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) from locally sourced ingredients.

Profile: Latino Economic Development Corporation

Overview

Immigrant-owned food enterprises are growing across Minnesota thanks to a series of Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) investments supporting several Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) projects in Minneapolis. With investments in a Latino-owned grocery, a cooperative grocery, a Latino restaurant, commercial kitchens, a marketing cooperative, a commissary kitchen, and a produce warehouse for small agricultural cooperatives, the LEDC Immigrant Enterprise Healthy Foods Fund is strengthening the local food system, improving health, and building wealth in low-income immigrant communities of color.

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