Establishing Principles for Good Food, Good Jobs: FoodLab Detroit Strategy Council Co-Lab #2

Overview

FoodLab Detroit is a community of food entrepreneurs committed to making the possibility of good food in Detroit a sustainable reality by designing, building, and maintaintaining systems to grow a diverse ecosystem of triple-bottom-line food businesses as part of a good food movement that is accountable to all Detroiters.

In partnership with the Work Department, a women-led social innovation design firm, the FoodLab Detroit Strategy Council members participated in a series of three interactive working sessions over the course of six weeks to define the core principles that enable the creation of Good Food and Good Jobs. This photo essay documents this engaging process.

The Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI)

Overview

An overview of the Healthy Food Financing Initiative. A viable, effective, and economically sustainable solution to the problem of limited access to healthy foods, and can reduce health disparities, improve the health of families and children, create jobs, and stimulate local economic development in low-income communities.

Profile: The ReFresh Project

Overview

In February 2014, as part of the renovation of a 60,000-square-foot supermarket vacant since Hurricane Katrina, a new Whole Foods in New Orleans celebrated its grand opening. The store, which offers more than 330 local products, was built with a strong emphasis on affordability and community partnership.

Leveraging Institutional Purchasing Power

Overview

Institutions such as hospitals, schools, businesses, and government agencies play a number of important roles in a community: service provider, employer, educator, as well as community and cultural hub. These institutions also play an important role in advancing the health and well-being of communities and can do so by leveraging their purchasing power to expand healthy food access for residents, clients, employees, and students. Across the country, institutions are advancing innovative food procurement programs and policies that are aligning food purchasing to support access to healthy, affordable, and sustainably produced food, strengthen local economies, grow quality jobs, and advance environmental sustainability. 
 
This webinar highlights examples, promising strategies, and lessons learned in engaging with health care, educational, and business institutions to shift purchasing practices toward improved healthy food access and more equitable food systems.
 
Featured Speakers: 
Ted Howard, Co-Founder and President, Democracy Collaborative
Lucia Sayre, Regional Director, Health Care Without Harm
Adam Kesselman, Project Director, Center for Ecoliteracy
Estefanía Narváez, West Coast Regional Coordinator, Real Food Challenge
Diana Rivera, Research Associate, PolicyLink (moderator)

The Vermont Farm to Plate Investment Program

Overview

This profile highlights the Farm to Plate (F2P) Investment Program, which was designed to strategically strengthen the state’s food and farm sector and encourage the purchasing of local foods.
 
The Vermont Legislature commissioned the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund to develop a strategic plan to revitalize its food and farm sectors and increase purchasing of local foods. Implementation is under way with more than 350 organizations working together as the Farm to Plate Network, including the Farm to Institution Task Force focused on increasing institutional local food procurement.

WEBINAR-Grocery Store and Retailer Scorecard

Overview

The “Grocery Store and Retailer Scorecard” is modeled on a successful and similar self-assessment scorecard developed for school lunchrooms by the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab and adopted by the United States Department of Agriculture. This webinar presents the “Grocery Store and Retailer Scorecard” tool and features speakers that highlight the behavioral economics that informed the tool’s development and the research conducted with grocers on feasibility and retailer adoption.

Profile: Portland Mercado

Overview

The Latino community in Portland, Oregon, has grown rapidly in the last 20 years, from 3.3 percent of Portlanders to 11 percent, and by 2040 it is estimated that 23 percent of the city’s residents will be Latino. This growth, however, has not been accompanied by increases in opportunity.

Recognizing the important link between access to healthy food, economic opportunity, community building, and culture, Hacienda Community Development Center (CDC) secured a federal Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) grant in 2012 to develop Portland Mercado, an innovative project which includes a Latino cultural space and public market, bringing fresh food and good jobs to the community.

Running a Food Hub: Assessing Financial Viability

Overview

This report is volume 3 of USDA’s food hub technical report series and provides modules, best practices, and financial benchmarks for different stages of business development for food hubs to assess their own financial viability and assist in making strategic business decisions to maximize profits and control costs.

Profile: Virginia Fresh Food Loan Fund

Overview

In 2013, Virginia Community Capital (VCC) launched the Virginia Fresh Food Loan Fund to enhance access to nutritious foods in Virginia’s inner cities, small towns, and rural communities. As a community development financial institution (CDFI), VCC supports small businesses and community development projects by offering flexible capital, investment opportunities, and advisory services.

Convenience Store Distribution Options for Fresh Produce

Overview

Published by the National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS) and the United Fresh Produce Association, this new resource looks at distribution options available to store owners and provides an overview of the various options available to retailers seeking to increase their fresh produce offerings.

Featured Resource: Healthy Food Financing Programs Across the Country

Overview

Developed by The Food Trust, this list outlines federal, state, and regional Healthy Food Financing Programs across the country.

2016 Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) Grantee List

Overview

2016 Healthy Food Financing Initiative Grantee List.

Perspectives of Urban Corner Store Owners and Managers on Community Health Problems and Solutions

Overview

Urban corner store interventions have been implemented to improve access to and promote purchase of healthy foods. However, the perspectives of store owners and managers, who deliver and shape these interventions in collaboration with nonprofit, government, and academic partners, have been largely overlooked. We sought to explore the views of store owners and managers on the role of their stores in the community and their beliefs about health problems and solutions in the community.

2011 Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) Grantee List

Overview

2011 Healthy Food Financing Initiative Grantee List.

WEBINAR-Funding Your Healthy Food Project with USDA Resources

Overview

As a nation, we must foster a food system that ensures urban and rural communities have access to fresh and healthy foods; small and mid-size farmers can produce and market food in an economically and sustainable manner; and consumers have the resources they need to live healthy and productive lives.
 
This webinar introduces the audience to several programs at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and provide examples of how USDA funding is being tapped to improve access to healthy foods and support local food system development in low-income urban communities.

Profile: Nojaim Brothers Supermarket and the New York Healthy Food and Healthy Communities (HFHC) Fund

Overview

The Nojaim Brothers Supermarket, Syracuse’s only independently owned grocery store, and a community hub — faced possible closure in 2010 due to dated infrastructure and decades of population and economic decline.
 
In addition to renovating his store, Paul Nojaim is working to help revitalize the Near Westside neighborhood. Through his leadership, the store is collaborating with St. Joseph’s Hospital, Syracuse University, and the Onondaga County Department of Health on several initiatives.

WEBINAR-Research Your Community: Virtual Training

Overview

Research Your Community is a new mapping tool available on the Healthy Food Access Portal that can help individuals and organizations better understand the communities in which they are working in to improve access to healthy food.

The tool can also be a valuable resource for your advocacy and fundraising efforts. The grocery landscape is ever changing, and data is one of many ways to paint a picture of a community’s need for healthy food access interventions. This webinar will train users about how to effectively leverage this new tool.

Profile: Cooperative Fund of New England

Overview

The Cooperative Fund of New England  has played a leading role in financing the Northeast’s cooperative food movement. As a CDFI it has served as a financer, lender, and advisor to nearly every food co-op in the area.

Cooperatives differ from traditional businesses in that they are jointly owned by, and operated for the benefit of, the people using their services. A cooperative’s profits are distributed among its members, and decisions are made democratically.

Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Financing in Michigan

Overview

Michigan must address the significant need for fresh food resources in many of its communities. A myriad of factors have created a shortage of healthy food resources in lower-income areas across the state, creating a public health
crisis.
 
Despite having the nation’s second most diverse agriculture industry, 17.9% of Michigan’s residents are food insecure, meaning they lack reliable access to healthy food. In Kent County, home to Grand Rapids, the largest city in West Michigan, 80,000 people are food insecure.
 
More than 1.8 million Michigan residents, including an estimated 300,000 children, live in lower-income communities with limited
supermarket access. Underserved communities can be found in rural areas such as Hillsdale, Tuscola, Sanilac, Cold Water and Allegan, as well as in urban centers including Flint and Detroit.

2014 Analysis of Limited Supermarket Access

Overview

Reinvestment Fund's 2014 LSA analysis is an update to the 2011 study, Searching for Markets: The Geography of Inequitable Access to Healthy and Affordable Foods in the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s CDFI Fund through the Opportunity Finance Network. Reinvestment Fund undertook the 2014 update when our lending department observed that there were enough changes since the 2011 study (i.e., stores had opened and closed) that it was no longer sufficient for making financing decisions.

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