Federal

In 2009, PolicyLink, The Food Trust, and The Reinvestment Fund initiated a national campaign, with partners and stakeholders from across the country, to create a comprehensive federal response to address the limited and inequitable access to healthy foods in low-income communities in both rural and urban America. The White House and the First Lady recognized this challenge and paved the way to building a Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI), See here for a video of former First Lady Michelle Obama discussing policy solutions for improving access to healthy food.

Five years later, more than 100 organizations, representing a diverse set of stakeholders, have voiced their support for a national solution to the lack of access to healthy food. The campaign has resulted in the inclusion of HFFI in the farm bill, where it was authorized for up to $125 million and given a home in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Since 2011, over $195 million has been awarded through the federal HFFI, bringing jobs, economic development, and improving access to healthy food for low-income communities across the country. HFFI's public-private partnership model has leveraged over $1 billion in grants, loans, federal tax incentives, and investments from financial, health care, and philanthropic institutions, enabling HFFI to finance hundreds of successful projects. One-time grants and loans targeting both urban and rural communities have been distributed in more than 35 different states and are being used to create jobs, revitalize communities, and improve access to healthy food. See here for a summary of HFFI. Read Financing for Healthy Foods to learn more about the impact of HFFI and CDFIs on improving healthy food access in low-income communities.

HFFI grantees are using their HFFI funds to support a wide range of healthy food projects that are designed to meet locally determined community needs and priorities, including the construction of new and renovated grocery stores, farmers markets, corner stores, food hubs, mobile markets, kitchen incubators, cafes, and even urban farms. 

Search this list of states to find HFFI grantees and projects in your community.
 

Arizona

Tohono O'odham Community Action

Tohono O'odham Community Action (TOCA) is using HFFI financing to support the creation of Desert Rain Food Services (DRFS). DRFS will develop a local food service "social enterprise" to sustain the healthy food traditions and meet the local economic needs of the Tohono O'odham tribe in Southern Arizona. DRFS will provide healthy, locally grown nutritious meals for school and institutional customers in the Tohono O'odham Nation, which is categorized as a food desert. The main reservation currently has only one supermarket, which is not sufficient for the Nation's 25,000 residents. This grant will also impact the quantity of fresh produce that Tohono O'odham school children consume in the two meals they receive under the free and reduced-price food program. Additionally, DRFS will be able to create 15 jobs for residents. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

California

Community Services Unlimited, Inc.

Based in Los Angeles, Community Services Unlimited, Inc. (CSU) is using HFFI financing to support its Community Food Village Project, Growing Healthy program, and From The Ground Up! program. The Village Market Place program sells and distributes fresh produce from CSU's urban mini-farms and local farmers, increasing access to healthy foods in the community while creating meaningful jobs for youth and adults. Growing Healthy engages youth in urban farming and food-based learning as a tool to help them adopt a healthier lifestyle and develop an awareness and political consciousness to the food access and environmental justice issues impacting their communities.  From The Ground Up! is an apprenticeship program that offers at-risk youth training and mentorship in farming, gardening, and entrepreneurial skills.  You can find out more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

The East Los Angeles Community Union

The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU) is supporting a low-interest loan for Titan Foods, Inc. to improve access to affordable and healthy foods in Commerce City, a section of East Los Angeles that is underserved by grocery retail. Commerce City has more than double the national unemployment rate and this project will create 33 new, permanent, full-time jobs, the majority of which will be filled by low-income individuals, including CalWORKS/TANF recipients, non-custodial parents, and at-risk youth. The project will substantially improve the community's access and consumption of healthy foods, while improving the local economy. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Mandela MarketPlace, Inc.

Based in Oakland, California, Mandela MarketPlace Inc. (MMPlace) is using HFFI financing to support a revolving loan fund for business expansion. The two initial businesses to receive loans are Mandela Food Cooperative and Earth's Produce Distribution. Mandela Food Cooperative will use the loan to increase sales of healthy foods by 50% to $1.5 million annually. Earth's Produce Distribution will use the loan to increase delivery and consumption of fresh produce by 800,000 pounds annually. This project will create 20 new, permanent, full-time jobs in the grocery retail and produce distribution industries. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Capital Impact Partners

Capital Impact Partners, formerly known as NCB Capital Impact, is using HFFI financing to support the California FreshWorks Fund, a healthy food financing program that supports healthy food retail outlets in underserved communities throughout the state of California, including underserved areas in San Diego, Inglewood, Pismo Beach, and South Los Angeles. You can find more information about Capital Impact Partners here and about California FreshWorks and other projects funded through California FreshWorks here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Capital Impact Partners is a CDFI headquartered in Virginia, but Capital Impact Partners is working in California and Michigan.

Nonprofit Finance Fund

The Nonprofit Finance Fund (NFF) uses HFFI financing to offer healthy food retail outlets coupled with education and outreach programs that promote food purchasing behavior change in low-income communities. Some funds from this award will be used to support the creation of City Slicker Farms' $800,000 dollar project in West Oakland, California. This project is an urban farm and park. You can find more information about Nonprofit Finance Fund here and about City Slicker Farms here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program
Note: The Nonprofit Finance Fund is a CDFI headquartered in New York, but the Nonprofit Finance Fund is also working in California and Pennsylvania

Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance

In 2013, Stanislaus Economic Development and Workforce Alliance (The Alliance) received $800,000 dollars from the HFFI HHS program to develop the Turlock Supermarket Project through a public-private partnership with NUCP Turlock, LLC and Mi Pueblos Supermarket. The supermarket will be located in California's Central Valley, an area that produces half the fresh foods and vegetables in the U.S. but leaves many local, low-income residents without access to healthy, fresh food. This project will also create 40 jobs for residents from Turlock and surrounding areas. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

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Colorado

Colorado Enterprise Fund

The Colorado Enterprise Fund (CEF) is a partner in The Colorado Fresh Food Financing Fund (CO4F) and is using its HFFI grant to finance food production, small grocery retail, and innovative healthy food businesses, including farmers markets, bodegas, food carts, and produce stands. Expert small business lenders, CEF provides loans for equipment purchases, energy efficiency improvements, and leasehold improvements. CEF lends to all segments of the food system to foster healthy food access and economic development. You can find more information about the CEF here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

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Florida

Corporation to Develop Communities of Tampa, Inc.

Corporation to Develop Communities of Tampa, Inc. is using HFFI financing to make an equity investment to construct and co-own a 25,000-square-foot shopping plaza. This plaza would create 60 new jobs, with at least 25 of them full-time, which will also employ primarily low-income residents of the nearby community, including TANF recipients, non-custodial parents, and the chronically unemployed and underemployed. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Neighbors and Neighbors Association, Inc.

Neighbors and Neighbors Association (NANA), Inc. is using HFFI financing to sponsor the Redland Market Village (RMV) Expansion project in Naranja, Florida. The RMV is a retail center and farmers market, totaling 19,800 square feet. Thus far, the expansion has created 42 jobs, many of which are targeted to low-income individuals. The project expands food retail outlets at the farmers market and the existing Redland Market, with the purpose of building small businesses and expanding access to healthy food in Miami-Dade County, Florida. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Carrfour Supportive Housing, Inc.

Carrfour Supportive Housing, Inc. is using HFFI financing to increase production capacity at Verde Gardens in Miami-Dade County, Florida in partnership with Earth Learning. The Farm Enterprise at Verde Gardens is a 22-acre organic farm and nursery in a 5,000-square-foot building that houses a commercial kitchen, a farmers market, and a food processing facility. This project is expected to create 27 new, full-time jobs for low-income individuals and improve access to fresh, healthy, and nutritious foods through its mobile market and food distribution components. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

Go to Florida state and local page >

Georgia

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs (ACE) is using HFFI financing to launch Georgia's Healthy Food Financing Initiative. This initiative will provide funding to food retail businesses like Nature's Own Herb Shop, Inc. and Super Mercado El Latino, which are both located in low-income census tracts. The aim is to bring or expand grocery stores in USDA-defined food desert neighborhoods in Atlanta and Hapeville, Georgia. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

 

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Illinois

Chicago Community Loan Fund

Chicago Community Loan Fund (CCLF) is using HFFI financing to fund a pipeline of projects that include innovative approaches to food production such as urban farms, creative additions to food processing such as business incubators, and the addition of distribution centers such as farmers markets and supermarkets in underserved areas.  One project is the TurkeyChop in Chicago, Illinois, a restaurant that makes a difference in communities of color that lack healthy choices by providing leaner meat options with less fat and salt. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Emerson Park Development Corporation

The Emerson Park Development Corporation is using HFFI financing to create a supermarket in the Vieux Carre Shopping Plaza in a part of East Saint Louis, Illinois, that is underserved by grocery stores. The 14,535-square-foot supermarket will increase healthy food access for thousands of local and rural consumers. The project will create 24 jobs, of which 18 will be reserved for low-income individuals. These jobs will provide livable wages with benefits and career development opportunities. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

IFF

IFF used HFFI financing to establish the Healthy Food Access Program to finance both forprofit and nonprofit grocery stores in areas without access to fresh and healthy food. IFF has funded five grocery projects to date, including two in Illinois, and it has a pipeline of potential deals to fund in 2014. In Chicago, IFF funded Saver's Fresh Market Roseland, a 15,000-square-foot grocery store that is expected to create 19 jobs. IFF also funded the East St. Louis Save A Lot, a 14,000-square-foot grocery store that will host an in-store dietician and create 35 full- and part-time jobs. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: IFF is a CDFI headquartered in Illinois that is using HFFI financing in Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

 

 

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Iowa

IFF

IFF used HFFI financing to establish the Healthy Food Access Program to finance both forprofit and nonprofit grocery stores in areas without access to fresh and healthy food. IFF has funded five grocery projects to date, including one in Iowa, and it has a pipeline of potential deals to fund in 2014. In 2013, IFF helped finance C Fresh Market, a full-service grocery store that has already created 25 jobs in a high-poverty neighborhood of Des Moines. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: IFF is a CDFI headquartered in Illinois that is using HFFI financing in Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

Kansas

Argentine Neighborhood Development Association

The Argentine Neighborhood Development Association (ANDA) used HFFI financing to develop a Healthy Food Center as part of its Healthy Lifestyles Initiative to improve access to healthy and nutritious food in Argentine, Kansas. Prior to receiving HFFI funding, Argentine was a designated food desert with a lack of grocery store access to healthy, fresh, nutritious food. After three years of community engagement, participatory research, and town hall meetings, ANDA developed a business plan and attracted a supermarket partner, Save-A-Lot Food Stores. Construction began during summer 2013, and the new grocery store opened in December 2013. The HFC increased sustainable employment opportunities through the creation of 92 construction jobs and 34 post-construction jobs for low-income residents and TANF participants. The grocery store stays in close communication with the community to meet its needs and build on its strengths, such as bringing registered dieticians to share best practices for preparing culturally relevant foods. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

Go to Kansas state and local page >

Kentucky

Community Ventures Corporation, Inc.

Community Ventures Corporation (CVC) is using HFFI financing to expand capital access for small businesses in Kentucky through the Healthy Families in Kentucky loan fund. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

 

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Louisiana

ASI Federal Credit Union

ASI Federal Credit Union (ASI) is using HFFI financing for the Healthy Foods Revolving Loan Fund, which was created in 2011 to strengthen the healthy food distribution network in the New Orleans area. Thus far, ASI has financed the city's first food co-op, a new grocery chain flagship headquarters, and several smaller projects. The Healthy Foods Revolving Loan Fund will continue providing assistance in financing to the 66 New Orleans census tracts identified as food deserts. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Low Income Investment Fund

Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) is using HFFI funding to provide financing and technical assistance to food markets located in, or planning to locate in, low- to-moderate-income communities that lack access to affordable, healthy food. LIIF has funded projects in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania. Some of the funds from the award were used to support the transformation of a 65,000-square-foot abandoned supermarket in New Orleans into the ReFresh Market, an integrated healthy food center. You can find more information about LIIF here and about ReFresh Market project here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: LIIF is a CDFI headquartered in California, but LIIF is also working in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania.

 

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Maine

Coastal Enterprises, Inc.

Coastal Enterprises, Inc. (CEI) is using HFFI financing to support its Rural Healthy Food Access initiative. With this support, CEI assisted independent grocers and food hubs across Maine and New England. CEI has used HFFI funds to support the financing of five healthy food retailers, three food processors, and ten farms. Projects are located primarily in rural areas across Maine. The retailers range from a rural downtown local foods store, to a food hub and farmer's market, to a convenience store that is incorporating healthy foods into its offerings. These investments have leveraged approximately $15 million in other sources and created or retained more than 200 jobs. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: CEI is a CDFI headquartered in Maine that is working throughout New England.

Maryland

Microenterprise Council of Maryland

The Microenterprise Council of Maryland (MCM) will expand Big City Farms (BCF), an urban farm in Baltimore, Maryland that produces certified organic produce to area restaurants and households, specializing in field-to-table production. BCF currently has three farms and will use HFFI funds to open 20 more farms throughout the Baltimore area. BCF and MCM have a range of community partnerships that will support employee recruitment and support new farm opportunities, which will result in 48 full-time jobs. This project will also increase access to healthy, organic food in Baltimore through a low-cost, high-yield production of USDA certified organic products in an inner-city environment. Jobs created by this project will be targeted to women, minorities, ex-offenders, and noncustodial parents. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Reinvestment Fund

In Baltimore, Reinvestment Fund used HFFI funding to help finance Apples & Oranges Fresh Market and the Howard Park Supermarket. Apples & Oranges Supermarket is a minority-owned market in an East Baltimore neighborhood with an unmet grocery demand of $26.4 million. Apples & Oranges created four full-time and 11 part-time jobs, and it includes meeting space for nutrition and health education programs for the community. Reinvestment Fund is working with the Opportunity Finance Network and Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) to bring a 67,000-square-foot, full-service ShopRite supermarket to Baltimore's Howard Park community. The Howard Park ShopRite will provide access to fresh foods and create 250 full- and part-time jobs, many of which will be filled by neighborhood residents. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program and HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Reinvestment Fund is a CDFI headquartered in Pennsylvania that finances projects in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

Opportunity Finance Network

In Baltimore, Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) is working with TRF and Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) to support the construction of a 67,000-square-foot, full-service ShopRite supermarket in the Howard Park community. The Howard Park ShopRite will provide access to fresh foods and create 250 full- and part-time jobs, many of which will be filled by neighborhood residents. OFN also uses HFFI financing to provide capital to CDFIs that are ramping up their capacity to address food access issues but are not prepared to secure HFFI awards. OFN provides senior participation loans, long-term loans, and participation loans for healthy food projects. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Opportunity Finance Network is a CDFI headquartered in Pennsylvania that finances projects in Maryland.

 

Go to Maryland state and local page >

Michigan

Capital Impact Partners

Capital Impact Partners (CI) uses HFFI financing to support the Michigan Good Food Fund, an initiative that will expand access to healthy food for underserved Michigan residents by linking local food production with local retail. The Michigan Good Food Fund will provide grants and loans to projects that expand marketing opportunities for local food producers. Grants of up to $150,000 and loans of $250,000+ will be available to healthy food retailers, including producers, nonprofit organizations, commercial grocers, and food hub operators. The initiative launched in early 2014. You can find more information about Capital Impact Partners here and about the Michigan Good Food Fund here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Capital Impact Partners is a CDFI headquartered in Virginia, but Capital Impact Partners is using HFFI financing to work in California and Michigan.

Local Initiatives Support Corporation

The Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) uses HFFI financing to expand healthy food options in low-supermarket access areas. LISC has approved four healthy food loans in Michigan. In Detroit, LISC helped finance interior improvements at Seven Mile Foods so this 18,000-square-foot grocery store could offer more fresh foods. LISC also funded the expansion of Parkway Foods, which will expand to 32,000-square-feet and relocate to serve the Jefferson Village housing development. This project will create at least 15 new jobs and retain 23 positions. In Flint, LISC financed the relocation and expansion of the Flint Farmers Market, and in Kalamazoo, a LISC loan supports the Park Street Market, the only full-service grocery store in the area. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: The Local Initiative Support Corporation is a CDFI headquartered in New York, but the Local Initiative Support Corporation is working in Michigan

 

Go to Michigan state and local page >

Massachusetts

Cooperative Fund of New England

The Cooperative Fund of New England (CFNE) is using HFFI financing to increase healthy food access in New England and eastern New York State through the Healthy Food/Cooperative Communities initiative, which combines financing, development services, technical assistance, and data collection and measurement to increase low-income consumers' utilization and membership in co-ops. This work led five food co-ops in the past year to start implementing new programs to better serve low-income communities. For example, HFFI financing supported the expansion of the Harvest Food Co-Op in Boston, Massachusetts. You can find more information here.  

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: The Cooperative Fund of New England is a CDFI headquartered in Massachusetts that is working throughout New England and eastern New York State.

Local Enterprise Assistance Fund 

Local Enterprise Assistance Fund (LEAF) is using HFFI financing to support lending to food co-ops and community-owned grocery stores. LEAF is one of three CDFIs in the country with a focus on providing capital to cooperatives, which often pay wages and benefits above industry averages. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Local Enterprise Assistance Fund is a CDFI headquartered in Massachusetts that works nationally.

Common Capital

Common Capital, formerly Western Massachusetts Enterprise Fund, Inc., is using HFFI financing to increase access to pre-development grants for technical assistance and other soft costs. Some of these funds supported Simple Gift Farms, which sells produce at farmers' markets and is located in a USDA-defined food desert in Amherst, Massachusetts. Common Capital also financed an innovative program to deliver farm CSA shares to four low-income public housing units. By offering local farms an up-front CSA financing option, Common Capital enables farm CSAs to engage more low-income members who would otherwise be unable to pay up front for the 18-22 week produce delivery season. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Common Capital is a CDFI headquartered in Brookline, Massachusetts that is working throughout the state of Massachusetts.

Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation

Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation (DBEDC) is using HFFI financing to redevelop a 35,650-square-foot building into the Bornstein & Pearl Food Production Center in Dorchester, Massachusetts. CropCircle Kitchen, Inc. will run a commercial kitchen to foster the growth of local food businesses, create employment opportunities for residents, and facilitate improved access to healthy food in the immediate neighborhood. Through a partnership with two culinary training programs and DBEDC's Re-Entry initiative, the program intends to create at least 37 new full-time jobs for low-income individuals and those who face barriers to employment. You can find more information about project development here and about DBEDC here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Madison Park Development Corporation

Madison Park Development Corporation is using HFFI financing to expand an existing 8,500-square-foot Tropical Foods Supermarket into a full-sized, 30,000-square-foot supermarket in the Roxbury neighborhood of Boston. This market expansion has three major goals: 1) bring a desperately needed supermarket to Roxbury, a low-income neighborhood of Boston; 2) provide 46 permanent, full-time positions for the low-income residents of the neighborhood, of which 38 will be reserved for low-income local residents; and 3) act as a catalyst for future commercial development in the Dudley Square commercial center. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

United Teen Equality Center, Inc.

Founded in 1999 by youth responding to local gang violence, UTEC is now nationally recognized as a model youth development agency that works to nurture disconnected youth looking to trade violence and poverty for social and economic success. UTEC is using HFFI financing to build on its successful track record with FRESH Roots catering, which promotes healthy nutritional choices and trains young people in work, life, and culinary skills. HFFI financing allows UTEC to create a retail and catering café to increase access to healthy produce and create jobs for low-income residents. UTEC plans to create a minimum of five new food service businesses in downtown Lowell, Massachusetts. UTEC expects to create 37 jobs, at least 28 of which will be filled by low-income residents, specifically providing employment opportunities for young adults with past criminal backgrounds who face obstacles finding employment in the area. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Boston Community Capital and Reinvestment Fund

Boston Community Capital and Reinvestment Fund are partnering and using HFFI funding to support acquisition/predevelopment financing for Vicente Tropical Supermarket in Brockton, MA. The market primarily serves the immigrant community in Brockton and the surrounding area, and an estimated 70% of its customers are Cape Verdean and Haitian. The new store is located in a low-income tract (59% AMI) that is underserved by healthy food retail. The Brockton Community Health Center has agreed to develop an adult primary care/wellness clinic on the same site, adjacent to the new 32,000-square-foot Vicente Tropical Supermarket. The new store is projected to create 96 permanent jobs. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Reinvestment Fund is a CDFI headquartered in Pennsylvania that finances projects in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania

 

Go to Massachusetts state and local page >

Minnesota

Latino Economic Development Center

The Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) used HFFI financing to establish the Immigrant Enterprise Healthy Foods Fund, which invests in immigrant-owned, food-related enterprises that hire local low-income residents of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Six projects are under development with financing from the fund: a Latino-owned grocery, a cooperative grocery, a producer-owned retail store, a Latino tamale manufacturer, a commercial kitchen for Hmong growers, and a produce warehouse to benefit both local producers and a purchasing cooperative of Mexican restaurants and grocery stores. This program will create over 40 new full-time jobs and increase access to healthy food in these two low-income areas, including two USDA food desserts. LEDC is also using HFFI financing to co-develop Wirth Cooperative Grocery and establish two mobile grocery stores to circulate in high-need low-income areas. These projects respond to the nutritional needs of low-income residents, provide sales opportunities for immigrant farmers, and are expected to create an additional 38 new jobs. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

Go to Minnesota state and local page >

Missouri

IFF

IFF used HFFI financing to establish the Healthy Food Access Program to finance both forprofit and nonprofit grocery stores in areas without access to fresh and healthy food. IFF has funded five grocery projects to date, including two in Missouri: Jefferson Commons Save-A-Lot and the St. Louis Food Hub and Grocery Store. The Jefferson Commons Save-A-Lot partners with Casa de Salud, a neighborhood health and wellness organization, to promote the Despensa de Salud program to build skills in healthy cooking. The St. Louis Food Hub and Grocery Store, opened in January 2014 in a low-supermarket-access neighborhood, is expected to create over 100 jobs and see annual sales between $12 and 15 million. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: IFF is a CDFI headquartered in Illinois that is using HFFI financing in Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

 

Go to Missouri state and local page >

New Jersey

Reinvestment Fund

In Vineland, New Jersey, Reinvestment Fund helped finance Bottino ShopRite Supermarket. The project involved the construction of a new $25.7 million single-building retail center anchored by a 74,000-square-foot full-service supermarket. The retail center created 100 new jobs, of which half went to Vineland residents. You can find more information about Bottino ShopRite here and more information about Reinvestment Fund here

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Reinvestment Fund is a CDFI headquartered in Pennsylvania that finances projects in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

 

Go to New Jersey state and local page >

New Mexico

Siete del Norte Community Development Corporation

Located in Embudo, New Mexico, Siete del Norte Community Development Corporation (SDN) used HFFI financing to strengthen its Healthy Food Initiative, which provides direct support, economic incentives, and improved resource availability to regional farmers. SDN seeks to supplement farmers’ incomes, create jobs, and increase access to healthy, affordable foods through the administration of a no-interest $150,000 revolving loan fund for regional farmers. SDN is also using federal HFFI funding to: establish a year-round indoor Mercado and relocate another farmers market; create a food hub to provide local farmers with access to equipment, storage, and marketing resources to access secondary and institutional markets; and provide a venue for community workshops, trainings, and educational outreach. SDN expects to create 40 jobs. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

New York

Cooperative Fund of New England

The Cooperative Fund of New England (CFNE) uses HFFI financing to increase healthy food access in New England and eastern New York State through the Healthy Food/Cooperative Communities initiative, which combines financing, development services, technical assistance, and data collection and measurement to increase low-income consumers’ utilization and membership in co-ops. This work led five food co-ops in the past year to start implementing new programs to better serve low-income communities. For example, HFFI financing supported the movement and expansion of the Honest Weight Food Co-Op in Albany, New York. You can find more information here.  

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: The Cooperative Fund of New England is a CDFI headquartered in Massachusetts that is working throughout New England and eastern New York State.

Low Income Investment Fund

Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) is using HFFI funding to provide financing and technical assistance to food markets located in, or planning to locate in, low- to-moderate-income communities that lack access to affordable, healthy food. LIIF has funded projects in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania. Some of the funds from this award were used to support the development of healthy food supermarkets and a farmers market in the following New York cities: Mount Vernon, Highland Falls, Brooklyn, Buffalo, Red Creek, and Staten Island. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: LIIF is a CDFI headquartered in California, but LIIF is also working in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania.

Nonprofit Finance Fund

The Nonprofit Finance Fund (NFF) uses HFFI financing to offer healthy food retail outlets coupled with education and outreach programs that promote food purchasing behavior change in low-income communities. Some funds from this award were used to create a hydroponic produce farm in Brooklyn, New York. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: The Nonprofit Finance Fund is a CDFI headquartered in New York that finances projects in California, New York, and Pennsylvania

Greater Jamaica Development Corporation

Greater Jamaica Development Corporation (GJDC) used HFFI financing to implement the Queens Healthy Corner Store Initiative, a community-based food financing and economic development strategy in three low-income neighborhoods in Queens, New York. The Queens Healthy Corner Store Initiative creates increased access to healthy, affordable food, and it will create 40 new job opportunities. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation

South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation (SoBRO) is using HFFI financing to develop a new Fine Fare supermarket in the South Bronx. In addition to creating 25 new full-time jobs, this full-service supermarket will include a healthy eating grocery section offering fresh and affordable foods. The store will also provide free classes on healthy cooking for customers. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

Go to New York state and local page >

North Carolina

Green Opportunities Inc.

Located in Asheville, Green Opportunities (GO) is providing support and start-up capital for three food-related social enterprises: an urban agriculture enterprise, a community kitchen, and a grocery store. GO is also converting a closed elementary school into a community center/workforce training center and incubator. The social enterprises will create at least 34 full-time jobs for mostly low-income people along the French Broad River and improve access to fresh, affordable, and nutritious foods. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Self-Help Federal Credit Union

Self-Help Federal Credit Union is using HFFI financing to support its Healthy Foods System Lending Initiative, which will provide essential growth capital to improve the health and quality of life in low-wealth communities, particularly those in North Carolina. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

 

Go to North Carolina state and local page >

Ohio

Burten, Bell, Carr Development, Inc.

Burten, Bell, Carr Development, Inc. (BBC) used HFFI financing to support The Bridgeport Market, Café & Community Kitchen (MC2) initiatives in Cleveland, Ohio. Through the development of a market, café, and community kitchen, this project will create sustainable employment and business opportunities, improve access to healthy affordable foods, and promote education. The community kitchen includes a training area for cooking classes and health literacy classes for adults and youth, as well as a facility that allows local farmers and gardeners to prepare and package food. The MC2 food hub will hire and train up to 64 low-income people from the community. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Economic and Community Development Institute

The Economic and Community Development Institute (ECDI) is using HFFI financing to support the Food Desert Community Outreach and Jobs Creation Program in Columbus, Ohio. The program’s goal is to increase healthy food access and generate jobs for low-income individuals by creating a revolving loan fund for food-related businesses. ECDI is also working to develop an FCI Plaza Market grocery store and a community food commissary that serves as an incubator for food-based businesses. ECDI is also working with Green City Growers of Cleveland to develop a 3.25-acre hydroponic greenhouse, which will employ 40 residents and be the largest inner-city greenhouse in the U.S. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

University Circle Incorporated

University Circle Incorporated (UCI) is using HFFI financing to support a low-interest loan for the expansion of Constantino’s Market, a locally owned grocery in the University Circle neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, which is a low-income community that lacks healthy food access. The owners of Constantino’s Market worked with a certified training provider to break down barriers to employment for individuals with economic disadvantages, physical or mental disabilities, and/or a history of incarceration. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Cincinnati Development Fund

Cincinnati Development Fund (CDF) is using HFFI financing to underwrite a $190,000 loan for locally owned Clifton Natural Foods to move into a new location in Cincinnati, where they will expand fresh food options to include more produce and organic dairy, and become more accessible to the adjacent neighborhood, Northside, which is low/moderate income and recently lost their only supermarket. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation (YNDC) is using HFFI financing to support the expansion of Roots Urban Farm and the Kitchen Incubator project in Youngstown, Ohio. Roots Urban Farm offers training in gardening, farming, and vacant land reuse to participants of all ages. The Kitchen Incubator project aims to provide start-up businesses with facilities to create value-added food products. These programs will leverage approximately $900,000 in outside funding, and they will hire, train, and create entrepreneurship opportunities for 45 low-income community members. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

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Oregon

Hacienda Community Development Corporation

Hacienda Community Development Corporation (HCDC) and the Asamblea, a well-organized group of 25 low-income Latino entrepreneurs, are using HFFI financing to help plan and develop the Portland Mercado. The Portland Mercado will combine elements of indoor public markets in the U.S. with the bustle and feel of Latin American open-air markets. The Mercado entrepreneurs will offer a mix of goods and services, including culturally specific foods and handcrafted artisan items. The 5,200-square-foot Mercado will bring fresh food to an underserved community and create 47 jobs for low-income individuals. Vendors will operate as a cooperative, with the long-term goal of owning the Mercado as an asset for the Latino community. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Neighborhood Economic Development Corporation

Neighborhood Economic Development Corporation (NEDCO) is using HFFI financing to create CSA Prepped!, which is a channel for vendors to sell locally grown produce, grains, and herbs prepared in Sprout! Regional Food HUB (NEDCO’S commercial kitchen in Lane County, Oregon). CSA Prepped! aims to increase local, affordable food production and create 20 full-time jobs in the Willamette Valley of Western Oregon, a low-income area that lacks healthy food retail options. You can find more information here.  

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Pennsylvania

Fayette County Community Action Agency, Inc.

Fayette County Community Action Agency, Inc. is using HFFI financing to support the development of the Republic Food Enterprise Center (RFEC), a food hub located in Republic, Pennsylvania, and serving southwestern Pennsylvania. In addition to creating jobs in the food processing sector, the RFEC will coordinate with leading economic development organizations to support food-based initiatives and work to strengthen the connections between local growers, area residents, and leading commercial partners in the greater southwestern Pennsylvania region. This project intends to create up to 40 new, full-time jobs, of which 35 will be filled by low-income Fayette County residents. As part of the project, the RFEC also aims to expand six farmers markets in the region as part of this project. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Low Income Investment Fund

Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) is using HFFI funding to provide financing and technical assistance to food markets located in, or planning to locate in, low- to-moderate-income communities that lack access to affordable, healthy food. LIIF has funded projects in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania. Some HFFI financing supported The Plaza at Chelten project, a 50,000-square-foot retail and healthy food center in Philadelphia’s Germantown neighborhood. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: LIIF is a CDFI headquartered in California, but LIIF is also working in Louisiana, New York, and Pennsylvania.

Reinvestment Fund and Nonprofit Finance Fund

Fare & Square, a 16,000-square-foot supermarket, is the culmination of numerous attempts to attract a full-service grocery store to Chester, Pennsylvania. The store is located in an area where over 70 percent of residents live in a food desert according to data from the USDA Economic Research Service. Reinvestment Fund and Nonprofit Finance Fund partnered to help finance Fare & Square, which is the nation’s first grocery store run by a food bank.  The opening of Fare & Square created 69 full- and part-time jobs, which are filled primarily by Chester community residents. Fare & Square opened in September 2013. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: Reinvestment Fund is a CDFI headquartered in Pennsylvania that finances projects in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Nonprofit Finance Fund is a CDFI headquartered in New York that used HFFI financing in Pennsylvania.

The Enterprise Center Community Development Corporation

The Enterprise Center Community Development Corporation (TEC-CDC) used HFFI financing to support the Center for Culinary Enterprises (CCE) in West Philadelphia. The CCE is a $6-million, 13,000-square-foot, LEED-certified food business accelerator that serves as a hub of community health and nutrition resources. The project will create a total of 112 jobs over a three-year period. TEC-CDC is also helping develop the Philadelphia Restaurant Incubator to allow low-income entrepreneurs and mobile food truck operators to pilot and test their businesses in West Philadelphia. The Philly Restaurant Incubator will create 51 new jobs and result in the launch of at least seven new businesses. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Hill House Economic Development Corporation

Hill House Economic Development Corporation used HFFI financing to support the completion of a 36,000-square-foot, full-service supermarket in the Hill District neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The supermarket will create 44 permanent, full-time positions and 56 part-time jobs in a high-unemployment neighborhood that has lacked a grocery store for more than 25 years. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

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Puerto Rico

Brightwood Development Corporation

Brightwood Development Corporation (BDC) is using HFFI financing to support the Western Puerto Rico Food and Agro-Processing Center, a food processing and distribution facility in western Puerto Rico’s Porta del Sol region. The Center will house five tenants in the food processing and distribution segments, creating a minimum of 40 new jobs, of which 30 will be for low-income individuals. The Food and Agro-Processing Center supports local producers of healthy and organic vegetable products for distribution in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Hispanic market. BDC is using additional HFFI financing to improve its warehouse capacity, expedite distribution, providing technical assistance, expand the Mayaguez Seashore Farmers’ Market, and create a Harvesting Master Plan. These projects will create an additional 40 full-time jobs for low-income residents. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Note: Brightwood Development Corporation is a CDC headquartered in Massachusetts, but its HFFI project is in Puerto Rico.

Rhode Island

Cooperative Fund of New England

The Cooperative Fund of New England (CFNE) is using HFFI financing to increase healthy food access in New England and eastern New York State through the Healthy Food/Cooperative Communities initiative, which combines financing, development services, technical assistance, and data collection and measurement to increase low-income consumers’ utilization and membership in co-ops. This work led five food co-ops in the past year to start implementing new programs to better serve low-income communities. For example, HFFI financing supported the start-up capital expenses of the Fertile Underground Grocery Food Cooperative in Providence, Rhode Island. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

Note: The Cooperative Fund of New England is a CDFI headquartered in Massachusetts that is working throughout New England and eastern New York State.

Woonsocket Neighborhood Development Corporation

The Woonsocket Neighborhood Development Corporation used HFFI financing to develop real estate for two new businesses and seven micro-business start-ups in Woonsocket. These businesses will bring healthy food choices to the neighborhood, including a farmers market, a historic diner, and micro-enterprises with a focus on healthy food. Through existing CDC programming, these enterprises will provide low-income workers with access to training, affordable housing, and low-cost childcare. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

South Carolina

Butterfly Foundation

The Butterfly Foundation is using HFFI financing to support the creation of the Healthy Food Hub on the North Side of Spartanburg, South Carolina. The Healthy Food Hub will include a café, retail store, community rooms, incubator kitchen, urban gardens, and a farmers market. The project is expected to create 23 new jobs. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

South Carolina Community Loan Fund

South Carolina Community Loan Fund (formerly Lowcountry Housing Trust) used HFFI financing to create Lowcountry Produce, an authentic Southern artisan company that supports farmers and increases food access. The food market and café are located in the former Beaufort City Hall. The project increased access to healthy food for about 10,703 Beaufort residents, and it created 11 new jobs. You can find information here.  

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

 

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Tennessee

The Works, Inc.

The Works, Inc. used HFFI financing to support the expansion of the South Memphis Farmers’ Market to include a year-round greengrocer. The project will turn a vacant 3,600-square-foot former restaurant into a small grocery store with a permanent outdoor facility for the farmers’ market. An education and demonstration kitchen will host cooking and nutrition classes. This expansion will create 40 new, full-time, livable wage jobs with career potential for low-income residents in South Memphis. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Conexión Américas

Conexión Américas used HFFI financing to support the construction of the Mesa Komal Commercial Kitchen in the Casa Azafran Community Center in South Nashville, Tennessee. Community-based food entrepreneurs, primarily women, use the commercial kitchen to prepare healthy, low-cost food. The entrepreneurs receive technical and infrastructure assistance to help start and grow their businesses. The project is expected to create 51 full-time jobs and increase access to affordable food for 5,000 low-income residents. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

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Texas

CEN-TEX Certified Development Corporation

CEN-TEX Certified Development Corporation used HFFI financing to support Salud Corporation (SC), which is a Latina-led, for-profit start-up that manufactures and distributes high-quality extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) to replace unhealthy cooking lard. SC has priced its olive oil at a price point affordable to local Hispanic markets, and it will sell its olive oil both wholesale and retail in Austin, Texas. Bottling began in 2013, and Salud Corporation hopes to have 15 employees by the end of 2014.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

Neighborhood Housing Services of Dimmit County, Inc.

Neighborhood Housing Services of Dimmit County, Inc. (NHSDC) is using HFFI financing to support loans to healthy food retailers in ten Texas counties in the Middle Rio Grande Valley that lack access to healthy food. The Middle Rio Grande Valley is characterized by substandard housing, high unemployment, low educational attainment, and poverty. HFFI financing will benefit two Empowerment Zone counties (Dimmit and Zavala) and one Native American community (Kikapoo Tribe) in Maverick County. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

ACCION Texas, Inc.

ACCION Texas, Inc. is using HFFI financing to support lending for food retailers in low-income areas throughout Texas. Loans will be provided to small businesses, such as grocery stores, mobile food trailers, farmers’ markets, cooperatives, corner stores, and bodegas. ACCION is concentrating its lending in five counties without accessible fresh food. The counties, three urban and two on the border, are Bexar, Cameron, Dallas, Harris, and Hidalgo. Since ACCION is the nation’s largest microlender, loans will likely go to enterprises like food manufacturers, food distributors, food trucks, bakeries, and restaurants committed to making and selling healthy food. You can find more information here

Source of money: HFFI CDFI-Financial Assistance Program

 

Go to Texas state and local page >

Virginia

Total Action For Progress

Total Action For Progress (TAP), formerly Total Action Against Poverty in Roanoke Valley, is using HFFI financing to support a three-pronged economic development program that includes: comprehensive pre- and post-loan technical assistance and business development services, access to employment and training for participants who employ low-income or TANF participants, and a revolving loan fund for new or expanding services. You can find more information here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program

 

Go to Virginia state and local page >

Wisconsin

Martin Luther King Economic Development Corporation

Martin Luther King Economic Development Corporation used HFFI financing to support the completion of the Milwaukee Fix and Clock Shadow Building Project. The Clock Shadow Building includes businesses that produce healthy food products and provide critical comprehensive health services in an underserved community. Completed in April 2012, the Clock Shadow Building includes four food production/processing operations, including Clock Shadow Creamery, Roof Top Farm, Purple Door Ice Cream, and Martha’s Pimento Cheese. The upper floors host the Healing Collective, which operates programs that integrate mental, physical, and spiritual health services, and the roof is home to the Rooftop Farm, which is used in healing and education programs. This project has created 28 jobs, of which 17 are filled by low-income people. You can find more information about the Clock Shadow Building Project here.

Source of money: HFFI CED Program